Getting-to-Know Crossbows Seminars
Posted on 08/05/2015
Respect Protect Enjoy LogoFor Immediate Release: August 5, 2015
Media Contact: Chris Saunders, 802-343-5487
Getting-to-Know Crossbows Seminars

MONTPELIER, Vt. – Although the new Vermont regulation on crossbows does not go in effect until 2016, now is the perfect time for would-be crossbow hunters to become acquainted with them.

Vermont Fish & Wildlife is sponsoring four free Getting-to-Know Crossbows seminars in August and September.

Hunters are reminded that crossbows will be legal only for adults 50 and older starting in 2016, or for those who qualify now or in 2016 for a crossbow permit because of a disability. However, their use may be expanded in the future, and crossbow seminars are open to anyone interested in getting a jump on learning about crossbows.

“Despite the similarities, crossbows differ from regular bows in a number of ways,” said Christopher Saunders, Fish & Wildlife’s hunter education manager. “They are not the long-range hunting tools many people make them out to be, and some of the safety measures seem downright counterintuitive. For instance, you actually cock your crossbow, minus the bolt (arrow), before getting into a treestand. Inside information like this makes these seminars invaluable.”

Led by seasoned hunter education instructors, seminar topics include crossbow basics, hunting techniques and important safety tips. The free seminars will run two to three hours, and all participants will have a chance to shoot a crossbow.

Date Location Town Time
8/15 Marty’s Sport Shop Bennington 1:00 pm
8/29 Caledonia Forest & Stream St. Johnsbury 10:00 am
9/13 Lamoille Valley Fish & Game Morrisville 10:00 am
9/19 Barre Fish & Game Barre 10:00 am

Online registration is required by going to vtfishandwildlife.com and clicking on the Hunter Education page. A confirmation email will follow after registering.

“Our Getting Started seminars are for anyone who wants to learn more about the topics as they relate to regulated enjoyment and conservation of fish and wildlife resources, and also to expand the knowledge of current hunters, trappers, anglers and as well as other outdoor enthusiasts,” said Saunders.

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