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  Buy Your License
Get the Lead Out

loon WHAT'S THE PROBLEM?

WHY CARE SO MUCH ABOUT LOONS?

WHAT SPECIES OTHER THAN LOONS ARE AFFECTED?

HOW CAN ANGLERS HELP?

While fishing, you can help by following the law; As of January 1, 2007, it will be illegal to use a lead sinker weighing one-half ounce or less to fish in Vermont. You can also help by voluntarily removing lead-headed jigs one inch or less in diameter from your tackle box. Many lead sinkers and jigs are similar in appearance to the small stones and grit that birds swallow to aid in digesting food in their gizzard. Switching to lead- free tackle will reduce the chance that loons and other waterbirds will swallow poisonous lead products that have accidentally fallen into the water or that were lost while fishing. Loons and other waterbirds may also eat fish that contain a hook and sinker broken from an angler's line.

Where can I purchase non lead sinkers?

Will switching to other materials affect fishing?

While using alternatives to lead sinkers, anglers may need to think creatively when rigging their lines because of differences in the weights of these materials. Many anglers have reported good success with the use of less weight, allowing for a more natural appearance and presentation of the bait or lure used.

What Can You Do?

Enjoy fishing


Obey the law. As of January 1, 2007, it will be illegal to use a lead sinker weighing one-half ounce or less to fish Vermont. Get the Lead Out Legislation
  • Remove and properly dispose of all lead sinkers in your tackle box.
    How Can I dispose of my lead sinkers?
  • Follow the fishing laws as outlined in your Vermont Digest Hunting, Fishing and Trapping Laws.
  • Inform other anglers about the law.
  • Pick up a sample packet of FREE non-lead sinkers at the following locations; F & W District Offices, selected State Parks, Fishing Clinics and other Educational Programs, and at all State and Federal Fish Hatcheries in Vermont. harbor


  • Other Helpful Actions:

    jig



  • Remove fishing line and other materials from Vermont waters and shorelines to reduce entanglement.
  • Maintain a respectful distance from wild animals. Travel with binoculars. If a bird vocalizes as you approach, immediately back off.
  • Do not approach a loon nesting area.
  • Help monitor loon activity either all summer or during the annual loon count held the 3rd Saturday of July. Contact
    Eric Hanson, VINS Biologist and Coordinator of the Vermont Loon Recovery Project
    P.O. Box 22
    Craftsbury, VT 05826
    (802) 586-8064
    ehanson@vtlink.net.
  • Support loon and other nongame wildlife management efforts by donating to the NonGame Wildlife Fund on your Vermont income tax form or on hunting and fishing license applications.
  • Buy Vermont Conservation License Plates for your vehicle.
For more information, contact:
Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department
Vermont Agency of Natural Resources
1 National Life Drive, Davis 2
Montpelier, VT 05620-3702
(802) 828-1000 or http://www.vtfishandwildlife.com

GET THE LEAD OUT LOON WATCH VOLUNTEERING

HOW CAN I PROPERLY DISPOSE OF MY LEAD SINKERS?

WHAT HAVE OTHER RESEARCHERS FOUND?


WHERE HAVE LEAD SINKERS BEEN BANNED?


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS


WHERE CAN I GET MORE INFORMATION ON LEAD SINKERS AND LOONS.


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